Healing Power of Energy

I decided to reprise this piece from a few years back for a couple of reasons. First, to remind Chrysalids how important it is to protect their boundaries and personal space. Secondly, because of the scientific advances and understanding made in epigenetics since this article was written. (The link is to a video by author and lecturer Dr. Bruce Lipton.)

People Can Draw Energy From Other People The Same Way Plants Do
by MICHAEL FORRESTER, reprinted from PreventDisease.com

 

A biological research team at Bielefeld University has made a groundbreaking discovery showing that plants can draw an alternative source of energy from other plants. This finding could also have a major impact on the future of bio-energy eventually providing the evidence to show that people draw energy from others in much the same way.

Members of Professor Dr. Olaf Kruse’s biological research team have confirmed for the first time that a plant, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, not only engages in photosynthesis, but also has an alternative source of energy: it can draw it from other plants. The research findings were released [in 2012] in the online journal Nature Communications published by the renowned journal Nature.

Flowers need water and light to grow and people are no different. Our physical bodies are like sponges, soaking up the environment. “This is exactly why there are certain people who feel uncomfortable in specific group settings where there is a mix of energy and emotions,” said psychologist and energy healer Dr. Olivia Bader-Lee.

Plants engage in the photosynthesis of carbon dioxide, water, and light. In a series of experiments, Professor Dr. Olaf Kruse and his team cultivated the microscopically small green alga species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and observed that when faced with a shortage of energy, these single-cell plants can draw energy from neighboring vegetable cellulose instead. The alga secretes enzymes (so-called cellulose enzymes) that ‘digest’ the cellulose, breaking it down into smaller sugar components. These are then transported into the cells and transformed into a source of energy: the alga can continue to grow. ‘This is the first time that such a behavior has been confirmed in a vegetable organism’, says Professor Kruse. ‘That algae can digest cellulose contradicts every previous textbook. To a certain extent, what we are seeing is plants eating plants’. Currently, the scientists are studying whether this mechanism can also be found in other types of alga. Preliminary findings indicate that this is the case.

“When energy studies become more advanced in the coming years, we will eventually see this translated to human beings as well,” stated Bader-Lee. “The human organism is very much like a plant, it draws needed energy to feed emotional states and this can essentially energize cells or cause increases in cortisol and catabolize cells depending on the emotional trigger.”

Bader-Lee suggests that the field of bio-energy is now ever evolving and that studies on the plant and animal world will soon translate and demonstrate what energy metaphysicians have known all along — that humans can heal each other simply through energy transfer just as plants do. “Human can absorb and heal through other humans, animals, and any part of nature. That’s why being around nature is often uplifting and energizing for so many people,” she concluded.

Here are five energy tools to use to clear your space and prevent energy drains while releasing people’s energy:

Stay centered and grounded. If you are centered within your spiritual self (instead of your analyzer or ego) you will sense right away when something has moved into your space. If you are fully grounded, you can easily release other people’s energy and emotions down your grounding cord with your intention.

Be in a state of non-resistance. What we resists sticks. If you feel uncomfortable around a certain person or in a group, don’t go into resistance as a way to protect yourself as this will only keep foreign energy stuck in your space. Move into a state of non-resistance by imagining that your body is clear and translucent like clear glass or water. This way, if someone throws some invalidation at you, it will pass right through you.

Own your personal aura space. We each have an energetic aura surrounding our body. If we don’t own this personal space we are vulnerable to foreign energy entering it. Become aware of your aura boundaries (about an arms length away from your body all the way around, above and below) as a way to own your personal space.

Give yourself an energy cleanse. The color gold has a high vibration which is useful for clearing away foreign energy. Imagine a gold shower nozzle at the top of your aura (a few feet above your head) and turn it on, allowing clear gold energy to flow through your aura and body space and release down your grounding. You will immediately feel cleansed and refreshed.

Call back your energy. When we have our energy in our own space there is less room for other energy to enter. But as we focus on other people and projects we sometimes spread our energy around. Create an image of a clear gold sun several feet above your head and let it be a magnet, attracting all of your energy back into it (and purifying it in the gold energy). Then bring it down through the top of your aura and into your body space, releasing your energy back into your personal space.

Michael Forrester is a spiritual counselor and is a practicing motivational speaker for corporations in Japan, Canada and the United States.

Sources:

nature.com
communication-sensible.com

Dreamwork and Storyteller

burning man poster

Burning Man poster by Cory and Catska Ench.

“Occasionally something will capture your Dreammaker’s heart and you are given a numinous dream. You awake knowing you have come into contact with the presence of divinity. It’s important when receiving such a dream to take a step in the direction of its prompting, offering physical gratitude or a leap of faith, inviting the symbol to come on stronger. Soon, those numinous moments turn into hours, eventually days and, with enough fidelity to your path, a new life is born.” ~ Dreamwork with Toko-pa.

To read more from Toko-pa, sign up for her free newsletter.

I stumbled upon this powerful image and its accompanying text on Facebook about the same time I answered a question about Storyteller here on the Chrysalis website. (You can see the exchange here.)

In the above poster we see an embryo being transformed through a Third Eye experience by what we could call spiraling liminal energy. That would be the “energy of liminality” experienced in a hypnagogic state such as deep meditation or in a dream. It’s hypnagogic because experience of the numinous or divinity is considered a threshold or liminal experience. In the Chrysalis scheme of things, divinity is synonymous with your own Higher Self (destiny), or your transcendent Divine Child (sacred inner voice).

9 - Storyteller

Regardless of terminology, the point is that such liminal states, whether they be sleeping dreams, waking dreams or dreams experienced during deep meditation, all originate in the same place. In Chrysalis, we call this originating place the Otherworld in order to simplify terms and grant weighty religious fiddle-faddle a wide berth.

The Otherworld is what was once known as the aether before general relativity came along. The Sanskrit word for aether is Akasha. The Otherworld, therefore, can be described as a quantum field or network of interdependent energy (information) possessing an infinite number of nodes and nexuses located throughout the cosmos that are capable of communicating with and inspiring all sentient beings, not through words but through symbols, archetypes, power animals, memories and imagination, etc. (Plus other people!)

That’s why we believe it’s important when using tarot to allow the ego-oriented conscious mind (self with a little s) to wander off and commune in the darkened forest with egoless unconscious intuition, imagination and inspiration (Self). That’s where “numinous moments turn into hours” and consciousness gracefully morphs into Higher Self.

 

Is gender inequality man-made?

Reprinted from BBC Two.

People have long accepted that political power is man-made rather than god-given. But it’s been different for gender equality. History, religion, science, everything in fact, has seemed to condemn feminism for being against the natural order.

 Are there examples of true gender equality in the history of mankind? And if so, how far do we have to go back?

 

Catalhöyük – aggressively egalitarian?

It’s hard to get one’s 21st century head around the Catalhöyük settlement, which existed from approximately 7500 – 5700 BC.

The Seated Woman of Catalhöyük (6000 BC)

 

Its early inhabitants lived at the dawn of agriculture. They had semi-domesticated animals and were learning to sow crops. Not only did women have the same diets as men and inhabit the same physical space, but there were no wider hierarchies in the community.

Professor Ian Hodder explains, ‘there is no evidence of a big ceremonial centre or a chiefly house. We see these houses that look like they could produce more and could become quite dominant but there seems to be a cap that stops them doing it.’

The Mother Goddess

Catalhöyük has a special significance for anyone interested in women’s history. It is the lynch pin in the Mother Goddess argument. According to this theory Stone Age society was matriarchal, peaceful, spiritual and sexually uninhibited. Women were respected for their life-giving powers, and the feminine mysteries were worshipped.

In the 1960s, the swashbuckling archaeologist James Mellaart found at Catalhöyük one of the most powerful representations ever made of female divinity. Known as the ‘Seated Woman of Catalhöyük’, or more popularly the ‘Mother Goddess’, it is a clay figurine of a corpulent woman sitting on a throne, flanked by two large leopards, who appears to be giving birth. As he continued his excavations Mellaart unearthed a treasury of female imagery and figurines.

For Mellaart, and many others, this was the confirmation they sought for the Mother Goddess theory. Catalhöyük was proof that patriarchy was no more ‘natural’ than the pyramids.

When Professor Hodder took over the site, it wasn’t his intention to be controversial. Nevertheless, his findings have been revolutionary. His team dug through 18 levels, covering about 1,200 years of uninterrupted habitation. They found no evidence to support the claim that Catalhöyük was a matriarchy or that female fertility was worshipped over and above that of phallic or animal spiritualism.

But, Hodder insists, the question should never have been posed as an either-or issue. He argues that his team’s discoveries are so much more significant than anything previously imagined. Catalhöyük was a place were true gender equality flourished.

Read more: Dr Amanda Foreman discusses what we can learn from Catalhöyük

 

When did women’s rights begin to be restricted?

 

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When did civilisation begin to restrict women’s rights?

In 4,000 BC women had equality with men in Ancient Sumer, now modern-day southern Iraq.

In ancient Sumer – now modern-day southern Iraq – women enjoyed the same privileges as men in both society and commerce. But when the Akkadian King Sargon conquered, and Sumer became a Vassall state, the outlook for women drastically changed. 

The patriarchy promoted by law

 

When civilisations begin to write down their laws, this is when the patriarchy becomes enshrined. There is a phrase on the Enmetena and Urukagina cones – the earliest known law codes from circa 2400 BC – that says “If a woman speaks out of turn, then her teeth will be smashed by a brick.”

It was routine for women in ancient Greece to wear the veil
If a woman speaks out of turn, then her teeth will be smashed by a brick.
Enmetena and Urukagina cones (2400 BC)

 
Later, the Code of Hammurabi (circa 1754 BC) of ancient Mesopotamia proved a mixed blessing for women. The laws recognised the right for women to own property, while also forbidding arbitrary ill-treatment or neglect. In widowhood, wives were allowed to use their husband’s estates for their lifetime.

However, the code was a blow to women’s sexual freedom. Husbands and fathers now owned the sexual reproduction of their wives and daughters. This meant that women could be put to death for adultery and that virginity was now a condition for marriage.

The Veil

Some of the starkest double standards exist within the Assyrian laws from 12th century BC. Husbands could abuse (and even pawn) their wives freely, with the only restriction being they couldn’t kill them without cause. Women in Assyria had no rights and many burdens. If they have an abortion they can be executed, if they commit adultery they can be executed. And if their husband commits a crime, they can be punished in his place.

Within these laws there are the earliest examples of enforcing the veil, long before it was adopted by the Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Christians and Muslims. However, not all women are required to wear one.

The laws specify that wives, daughters and, indeed, concubines of the upper classes should not go outside uncovered. On the other hand prostitutes were not entitled to wear the veil, and any man seeing a prostitute wear the veil is to arrest her and she will receive ’50 lashes with a bamboo cane’. If a slave-girl is seen to be wearing a veil, she too is to be arrested; in this case her ears will be cut off and the man who arrested her may take her clothes.

Read more: BBC iWonder on what the veil means to different people and throughout history

The Ascent of Woman on BBC Two

Dr Amanda Foreman covers and explores the above topics in episode 1 of Ascent of Woman: ‘Civilisation’ on BBC Two 2 September at 9pm. The episode will be available to watch on BBC iPlayer shortly afterwards.

Dr Amanda Foreman

Episode 1 synopsis

In Anatolia, she visits Catalhöyük, one of the world’s earliest settlements, which archaeologists believe held remarkably different notions of gender. From Mesopotamia, she explores the world’s first law codes written to regulate women’s status and behaviour, including the world’s first known veiling law, two millennia before the advent of Islam.

Across Europe and the Near East, she uncovers a group of extraordinary women who created their own routes to power in male-dominated worlds. These include Enheduanna, the world’s first recorded author, the Ukok Ice Maiden, one of the great archaeological discoveries of the 20th century, and Hatshepsut, one of ancient Egypt’s most successful but most maligned ruling queens.

Crucially, she also explores the darker legacy of gender inequality in ancient Greece, whose influential ideas on the inferiority of women have cast a long shadow over women’s lives across the globe to this day. Amanda’s approach aims to profoundly alter the accepted view of civilization once and for all.